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Sophia Wang, M.D.

Sophia Wang, M.D.
Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry

 

Personal Statement  Alzheimer’s disease is the only disease among the top 10 causes of death in Americans that cannot be prevented, slowed, or cured. Given the rapid growth of the aging population, it is urgent that we create interventions which can prevent cognitive decline. My interests as a clinician-researcher is to better understand cognitive aging and to develop interventions which can prevent cognitive decline in older adults. My specific area of interest is to understand how acute medical and surgical events, such as hospitalization, can have long-term cognitive and functional effects in older adults. My goal is to design interventions which can prevent cognitive and functional decline in older adults during the hospitalization and post-hospitalization period.
Education 

Undergraduate: Harvard College

Medical School: Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Residency: Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Fellowship: VA Neurosciences Research Fellowship - James J. Peters VAMC affiliated with Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Geropsychiatry Fellowship - University of California San Francisco

Board Certificatoins/Certifications: American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, General Psychiatry. American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, Geriatric Psychiatry

Current Academic Interests 

Teaching: Supervising the general psychiatry residents in the Older Adult Mental Health Clinic; serving as the director of the geropsychiatry fellowship; and teaching didactics to residents and fellows in various disciplines about geriatric mental health

Clinical: Serving as the medical director of the Older Adult Mental Health Clinic at the Richard L. Roudebush VAMC

Research: My main area of interest is to understand how acute medical and surgical events (such as hospitalization) can have long-term cognitive and functional effects in older adults. My goal is to design interventions which can prevent cognitive and functional decline in older adults during the hospitalization and post-hospitalization period. 

Recent Publications 

1. Wang S and Blazer DG. Depression and Cognition in the Elderly. Annu Rev Clin Psychol. 2015 Mar 28;11:331-360.

2. Wang S, Luo X, Barnes D, Sano M, Yaffe K. Physical Activity and Risk of Cognitive Impairment among Oldest Old Women. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2014 Nov;22(11):1149-1157.

3. Neugroschl J and Wang S. Alzheimer’s Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment across the Spectrum of Disease Severity. Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine. 2011 Jul-Aug;78(4):596-612.

4. Wang S, Jacobs D, Andrew H, Tsai WY, Luo X, Sano M. Cardiovascular risk and memory in non-demented elderly women. Neurobiol Aging. 2010 Jul;31(7):1250-1253.

5. Hoffman E, Mintz CD, Wang S, McNickle DG, Salton SRJ, Benson DL. Effects of ethanol on axon outgrowth and branching in developing rat cortical neurons. Neuroscience.2008 Dec 2;157(3):556-565.

 6. Jin G, Arai K, Murata Y, Wang S, Stins MF, Lo EH, van Leyen K. Protecting against cerebrovascular injury: contributions of 12/15-lipoxygenase to edema formation after transient focal ischemia. Stroke. 2008 Sep;39(9):2538-2543.

7. Guo SZ, Wang S, Kim WJ, Lee SR, Frosch MP, Bacskai BJ, Greenberg SM, Lo EH. Effects of ApoE isoforms on beta-amyloid induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 in rat astrocytes. Brain Research. 2006 Sep;1111(1):222-226.

8. Wang S, Lee SR, Guo SZ, Kim WJ, Montaner J, Wang X, Lo EH. Reduction of tissue plasminogen activator-induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 by simvastatin in astrocytes. Stroke. 2006 Jul; 37(7):1910-1912.

9. Zhao BQ, Wang S, Kim HY, Storrie H, Rosen BR, Mooney DJ, Wang X, Lo EH.  Role of matrix metalloproteinases in delayed cortical responses after stroke. Nat Med. 2006 Apr;12(4):441-445.

 

Sophia Wang, M.D.

Department of Psychiatry | 355 W. 16th St., Suite 4800 | Indianapolis, IN 46202 | Ph: (317) 963-7288 | Fax: (317) 963-7313